Angie Baby Helen Reddy

Angie was a Rolling Stone

Momma used to sing to me, “Angie baby, you’re a special lady….”

Jon Wurster, drummer for Superchunk, and the Mountain Goats on Helen Reddy’s “Angie Baby”

“Possibly the most frightening song ever written. It’s the story of this girl, Angie, who’s described as ‘a little touched.’ She lives in her own imagination, and she’s listening to this rock station all the time. And then this creepy guy who’s been lurking outside of her house comes over and convinces her to let him hang out with her. But the music is so loud that he’s thrown off his game and he’s disoriented. And as she turns the radio down, he gets physically smaller, and he’s sucked into the radio. Then the scariest line ever is ‘never to be found.’ He’s in there forever! I think as a child, that’s what scared me the most. Like, Cannibal Corpse and Slayer, bands like that, they sing about being mutilated and butchered – but I don’t think any of their songs are as scary as a song with the idea of being shrunken down and sucked into a radio for eternity.”

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Video by John Wilson, Fine Art Films, for The Sonny & Cher Show.

Are You There God? It's Me, Gidget

The priest

by Angela Marié Glass

Beautiful. Wish I worked there. :0)
Bean there, counted that.
Themselves religious? Read here: ”
I bet he wears a hat.

She knew he’d get no relief.
Own personal custom Barbie dream.
Good grief.
New eyes from (Album Stream)

By Weezer and believed in paradise?
Founder of the Shadow Guard
Bored Cruz Cruise
From a thing, you little bastard. …
Bad / variant of Signal vs Noise ?

The Watchtower: I'm Perfect, You're Doomed (Kyria Abrahams)
Psychology, Religion

Wifely Subjection—Mental Health Issues in Jehovah’s Witnesses Watchtower Women

Wifely Subjection: Mental Health Issues in Jehovah’s Witness Women

Kaynor J. Weishaupt, M.S., M.F.C.C.
San Rafael, California
Michael D. Stensland
Athens, Ohio


The Watchtower Society, commonly referred to as Jehovah’s Witnesses, exerts a great deal of control over the everyday life of its members. Women, in particular, suffer from psychological stresses in this high-control environment, as it is also a culture where patriarchal attitudes limit women’s personal power and predominate in their relationships with men. A group of women responded to a questionnaire about their experiences during membership in the Watchtower Society and after leaving. The results indicate that while in the Watchtower Society, women experience a higher degree of mental health problems than they do after they leave the group. They also report experiencing more egalitarian attitudes in their relationships with men after exiting the group.

Little research has been done focusing on the experience of women in “high-control” or cultic groups, despite the fact that women make up a large proportion of the membership of such groups. The type of group referred to here as high-control is defined by the degree of control and restriction the group exercises over the everyday life of its membership. Such a group can be focused on religion, politics, militarism, psychotherapy, meditation, commercialism, or simply a “special” leader (Tobias & Lalich, 1994). A high-control group differs from other groups in that individual behavior is excessively limited by rules and regulations, access to information is restricted or managed (especially information critical of the group), pressure is high to conform in thought and behavior to group norms, and members must put the group’s interests before their own. The leadership in this type of group is absolute and considered infallible; outsiders are generally viewed as dangerous or evil; and members leaving the group are generally punished or shunned. While all members of such groups pay a psychological price (as well as reap certain psychological dividends, such as a sense of belonging and purpose), women often face particular difficulties in groups that are patriarchally based.

This article explores the relationship between women and the high-control social climate of the Watchtower Society (WTS), commonly referred to as Jehovah’s Witnesses. The article reviews literature bearing on the Watchtower Society’s control practices and patriarchal organizational structure, analyzes psychological implications of WTS’s social climate, and reports on the results of a survey of 20 female former members of the Watchtower Society. The survey explored three areas: (1) the degree of patriarchal versus egalitarian attitudes subjects felt existed while they were members of WTS compared to what they experienced after having left the group, (2) subjects’ perceived psychological distress while in the group and after exiting, and (3) subjects’ perceptions of the degree to which the group controlled everyday life and isolated members from outsiders. The latter area included a comparison group of women from other religious backgrounds.

The Watchtower Society as a High-Control Group
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Ancestry, Are You There God? It's Me, Gidget, Culture, Ethics, Prophecy, Psychology, Religion

WATER retention rates — RE-legions

Come Out of Her My People

The “De-Churching” of America

The number of Americans claiming no religious affiliation has quadrupled since 1990. Yet what religion had the lowest retention rate of any? Perhaps shockingly the Atheist “retention rate” was the lowest among the 20 separate categories in the study.

Still, in 2005 only 17 percent of Americans attended a religious service Sunday morning.

According to a study by Georgetown University’s Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA), “those who grow up in an atheist household are least likely to maintain their beliefs about religion as adults.”

Jehovah’s Witnesses have the next lowest retention rate at 37 percent. Continue reading

Lori's Love

To Lori with Love, for Kendall Louise


Lori Love Penland’s “Vinyle Word”, NoDa Charlotte, $1,200.00 on display at @SmellyCatCoffee.

View on Instagram

she doesn’t even know how legit she is

Lori didn’t say yes, technically speaking.

She said yes, repeatedly, and with ever mounting enthusiasm as she watched Love unfold live.

I’ve got you babe.

And yeah, “she doesn’t even know how legit she is“.

Love, and Me.

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Dr. Teeth and Electric Mayhem

Muppet Family

Name that Muppet: My uncle Herbie Niblick, and Me.


The Ghost of My Father by Scott Berkun


From bestselling author Scott Berkun comes this powerful new book, funded by hundreds of kickstarter supporters.

It’s a personal story about his failed relationship with his father, and how his family was torn apart  in 2012.

The book explores the meaning of family, through personal stories about Scott’s struggles to connect with his father, in the past and the present.

It’s an achingly personal memoir of loss, love and the hope of transformation by searching through the past.

It’s a book for anyone struggling with their identity in their family and seeking a bright path through dark times.

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@debbieblox Disrupting the Pink Aisle
Culture, Technology

Toys R’ Us and the Power of Pink—or Purple—“when I feel like it”.

In 2006 I wrote a paper about gender in toys, “Toys R Us—Engendering Children Are Us” for my UW Sociology of Family course.

Now it’s 2014 and we’re demolishing gender stereotypes and disrupting the pink aisle…

Sterling realized she was one of the only female engineering majors at Stanford University.

The Story of GoldieBlox | Cassie Jaye from Focus Forward Films on Vimeo.

“When Debbie Sterling set out to create GoldieBlox engineering toys for girls, she was hoping to sell much more than a product. She was hoping to inspire a movement that could eventually change the gender ratio in the engineering industry,” reports  from the Dallas Business Journal. Continue reading

Documentation, Ethics, Technology

Microsoft: On Karma and Protecting the Innocent

“Knowing and having faith that the system … that might be one of the additional super powers, that quite frankly, that women who don’t ask for raises have… because that’s good karma. It will come back.”—Nadella, at the 2014 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference

Publishing today in response to Microsoft’s CEO Nadella’s perspective of the super hero powers of women like me who don’t ask for raises.

Bad Karma Coming Out of the Closet

I treated this situation as confidentially as I could, to the extent possible, as asked, for as long as I possibly could. I think I did pretty well, no?

Photo credit @DotBen “SpunkyGidget at Mix ’06

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Angela @ Microsoft
Documentation, Ethics, Technology

I never asked for a raise, but I did get sexually harassed at Microsoft.

“Knowing and having faith that the system … that might be one of the additional super powers, that quite frankly, that women who don’t ask for raises have… because that’s good karma. It will come back.”—Nadella, at the 2014 Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference

“I’m absolutely reeling,” said Rachel Sklar, who in 2010 founded Change the Ratio, a group focused on increasing visibility for women in tech. “He put to words the massive fear women have in asking for raises and told them to trust in a system that is proven to be broken.”

Nadella also said he would “not fall for the crutch of the supply-side excuse” of women in tech, and that Microsoft was attempting to improve, despite recently released Microsoft diversity numbers that were similarly dismal to most tech companies. He advised women to be persistent in breaking into the industry.

I wonder what the percentage was when I was at Microsoft?

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The Funky Geezer Show by Carl Miller Photos

Funky Geezer

Woody Williams as NoDa's the Funky Geezer

Woody Williams as NoDa’s the Funky Geezer

So proud of our local NoDa Evening Muse and Facebook favorite Woody Williams the “Funky Geezer“, “America’s Got Talent” and YouTube music comedian.

Grandpa can shred, but Woody Williams as the Funky Geezer is more than any one man band you’ve ever seen.

See for more on Woody Williams performing as The Funky Geezer Show.


Photos: Carl Miller Photos, and Woody Williams.