The Hypomanic Edge

The Happy Hypomanic’s Handbook

“Intense creative episodes are, in many instances, indistinguishable from hypomania” — Kay Jamison

Besides the birth control pill, I’d only ever had two prescriptions, but those two were the dyna-combo to do me in—I suffered paradoxical effects from Clonazepam, and Ambien was no joke.

It took me until 2011 to make the connection.

Clonazepam induced hypomania, and I suffered benzodiazepine induced depression and rebound insomnia.

I never took another pill, but was dismayed to learn just how long my body would take to be rid of the drug and it’s cognitive interference: difficulty concentrating, confusion, irritability.

Worse yet, it seems they’d broken my happy.

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Gidget... ‘Dear Diary—et al.’

I Googled Gidget and Windansea

Are You There God? It’s Me, Gidget.

“Nobody knows I’m a real person — they think “Gidget” is Sandra Dee or Sally Field.”—Kathy Kohner Zuckerman

@Ori would remember the night I walked and told him of all the creepy sites on those dark streets which weave the beach along Windansea into Draper Villas…

< BEGIN CONTEXT / SHIFT TO PRESENT TONE >

Authentic Non-Fiction Life

[Richard] Powers is especially effective at illustrating the way the story of the girl with “the happiness gene” spreads across the Internet and, only slightly less rapidly, the traditional media. Thassa’s mailbox starts filling up: “Strange people with Hotmail accounts want me to make them happy. One woman wants to hire me as her personal trainer. She thinks her soul needs a professional workout.”

… This review was written by Jay McInerney (“How It Ended: New and Collected Stories”) and published in The New York Times Sunday Book Review, October 1, 2009. … when I first stumbled into this story the other day, I did a double take… it read like my life…

“Meanwhile, Kurton’s research team is on the verge of publishing a study that correlates specific genetic codes with emotional well-being. But despite the large sample on which the study is based, Kurton is holding back on publication, looking for some missing datum to confirm his findings. When Thassa’s story comes to his attention he thinks he may have found it. …”

I remember listening to a Nobel Prize contending researcher detail his observations of my hyperthymic temperament…

“Kurton persuades Thassa to undergo a series of tests, and when the results are finally published — the ebullient Thassa’s genetic material having confirmed the initial findings — media interest in the Happy Gene Girl goes manic, culminating with an appearance on a Chicago talk show whose host, known to all simply as Oona, “is, by any measure, the most influential woman in the world.” In a canny elision, Powers gives us only hints of Thassa’s triumphant performance, by way of its echoes on the Internet. … “

My effervescent happiness, despite the most contrary of circumstances, led me to be taken and tested, poked and prodded, and accused many more times of being “on something”. Continue reading

Hope 4 Haley and Friends—NC’s Push for Cannabis for Kids

In March, Darryl and I made a video interviewing North Carolina families with children who suffer from life threatening seizures who all want to bring CBD oil to North Carolina. That video made it to North Carolina Representative Pat McElraft who is working on “Hope for Haley”—for Haley who lives in her district.

State lawmakers last year defeated a bill that would have legalized “medical marijuana” in North Carolina.

March 10 Update: North Carolina Lawmaker seeks to legalize marijuana oil for NC children with severe epilepsy

March 11 Update: Hope for Haley: The face behind the push to legalize CBD oils in NC

Utah had a similar bill called Charlee’s Law—days after Utah passed Charlee’s Law, Charlee Nelson died. She was just six years old.

How strange—my blog reports the news of marijuana related deaths, but in this case it’s solely to report those related to the inability legally access and use cannabis sativa, more casually called “marijuana”.

On a long distance call with a relocated-to-Colorado mom I found it absolute astounding to find out that the first in line for marijuana when they legalized it earlier this year was a veteran with PTSD—because while Colorado had already had legalized “medical marijuana” it was only for a strict list, which did not include PTSD.

June 26 Update: See Governor McCrory Releases Statement on Bill That Legalizes Seizure Treatment

Days after Charlee’s Law passes, Charlee Nelson dies at age 6

“She was in good enough shape to be there and be present. In the House when all the representatives stood up and gave her a round of applause, she perked up like she knew it was for her.”

Froerer said some representatives “really broke down” when they saw Charlee brought to the floor in a wheelchair.

Cannabis oil wouldn’t have cured Charlee, but it might have calmed her seizures and prolonged her life.

North Carolina children are fighting for the same treatment.

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