Neuroscience

Clonazepam Side Effects: Hypomania, a study from 48 people by eHealthMe.com

Found eHealthMe—”FDA and Social Media personalized”—with a report on Clonazepam and Hypomania.

“22,881 people reported to have side effects when taking Clonazepam. Among them, 48 people (0.21%) have Hypomania.”

See: Clonazepam Side Effects: Hypomania, a study from 48 people by eHealthMe.com

Hypomania (literally, below mania) is a mood state characterized by persistent and pervasive elevated or irritable mood, as well as thoughts and behaviors that are consistent with such a mood state. Individuals in a hypomanic state have a decreased need for sleep, are extremely outgoing and competitive, and have a great deal of energy. However, unlike with full mania, those with hypomanic systems are fully functioning, and are often actually more productive than usual. Specifically, hypomania is distinguished from mania by the absence of psychotic symptoms and by its lower degree of impact on functioning. Hypomania is a feature of bipolar II disorder and cyclothymia, but can also occur in schizoaffective disorder. Hypomania is sometimes credited with increasing creativity and productive energy. A significant number of people with creative talents have reportedly experienced hypomania or other symptoms of bipolar disorder and attribute their success to it. Classic symptoms of hypomania include mild euphoria, a flood of ideas, endless energy, and a desire and drive for success. A lesser form of hypomania is called hyperthymia.

Drug-induced hypomania is not invariably indicative of bipolar affective disorders. 

Hypomania is also a side effect of numerous medications, often—though not always—those used in psychopharmacotherapy. Patients suffering from severe depression who experience hypomania as a side effect of (for example) antidepressants, may prove to have a form of bipolar disorder that has previously gone unrecognized. However, drug-induced hypomania is not invariably indicative of bipolar affective disorders. The difference between uni- and bi-polar disorders is essential for analysis of switches. Consequently, it is important for researchers and mental health professionals to distinguish drug-induced hypomania in bipolar patients from drug-induced hypomania in unipolar (non-bipolar) depressives. Nevertheless if antidepressants trigger the first episode of hypomania, it is strongly suggestive of an underlying diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder, particularly if the manic symptoms (mild, moderate or severe) last for a lengthy period of time after they start. In cases of true drug-induced hypomania, cessation of the antidepressant or whichever drug has triggered this mood state – for example steroid therapy or stimulants such as amphetamine – usually causes a fairly swift return to normal mood.

Standard