Religion

Largest Corporations in New York City? Largest Property Development Corporations in the World?

#Jehovah‘s #Witnesses are one of the largest property development #corporations in the #world–owning over 80,000 properties.

The Watchtower recently began acquiring even more property when they began converting their “Kingdom Halls” over from private properties owned by the individual congregations into corporate property owned by ‘the Society‘.

1909: #Headquarters of the #Society is moved to Brooklyn, New York, in April.

$802.45 million dollars of #Brooklyn property has been sold since 2004.

The Watchtower is leaving Brooklyn, last property lists for $400 million = $ One #Billion two hundred two Million four hundred fifty thousand.

That’s more dollars than … Jehovah’s Witnesses.

But who’s counting?

#Jehovah’s #Witnesses are one of the largest property development #corporations in the #world–owning over 80,000…

Posted by Angela Glass on Tuesday, December 8, 2015

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Ancestry, Are You There God? It's Me, Gidget, Prophecy, Religion

May 14, 1948 – 907,200 days = 537 B.C. in Jerusalem

God told the nation of Israel, “Observe my Sabbaths and have reverence for my sanctuary”. 

They were warned, “But if you do not obey Me, and do not observe all these commandments, … I will set My face against you, and you shall be defeated by your enemies. Those who hate you shall reign over you, and you shall flee when no one pursues you…”

“‘And after all this, if you do not obey Me, then I will punish you seven times.” — Leviticus 26

The records of Kings and Chronicles tell what happened… judgment is due, but it will wait until after Josiah passes:

“You were sorry and humbled yourself before God when you heard his words against this city and its people. You humbled yourself and tore your clothing in despair and wept before me in repentance. And I have indeed heard you, says Yehowah יְהוָה. So I will not send the promised disaster until after you have died and been buried in peace. You yourself will not see the disaster I am going to bring on this city and its people.’” — 2 Chronicles 34

Josiah was the father of Jehoiachin and his brothers (who were born at the time of the exile to Babylon). (Matthew 1:11) Continue reading

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Magna Carta . Holy Grail . Heaven
Ancestry, Are You There God? It's Me, Gidget, Music, Religion

Magna Carta . Holy Grail . Heaven

Magna Carta . Holy Grail . Heaven

Magna Carta . Holy Grail . Heaven — Jay-Z

“Boy they loves Hova.”

Illuminati, spirit-directed, or holy?

“Y’all religion causes division”

Who created religion?

“Only God could judge us.”

“Hovah”  is a play on Jay-Hova, or Jehovah, one of the Old Testament names of God.

Signs and symbols control the world, not phases and laws.
Confucius (551-479 BC)

Some say Jay-Z got the nickname back in 1993, when he borrowed some studio time and was recording some of his first tracks. The other people in the studio marveled to discover that Jay-Z was improvising all his lyrics, and decided that his ability was nothing short of miraculous. So they dubbed him J-Hova.

Others claim “Hova” stands for “Hustler of Virginia” where Jay-Z “hustled” as a play on “Jehovah”.

The obscure reference may be the link of hovah (a Hebrew word meaning destruction) and the oracle of Revelation, “”.

The psychological mechanism that transforms energy is the symbol.
Carl Jung (1875 – 1961)

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Psychology, Religion

Wifely Subjection—Mental Health Issues in Jehovah’s Witnesses Watchtower Women

Wifely Subjection: Mental Health Issues in Jehovah’s Witness Women

Kaynor J. Weishaupt, M.S., M.F.C.C.
San Rafael, California
Michael D. Stensland
Athens, Ohio

Abstract

The Watchtower Society, commonly referred to as Jehovah’s Witnesses, exerts a great deal of control over the everyday life of its members. Women, in particular, suffer from psychological stresses in this high-control environment, as it is also a culture where patriarchal attitudes limit women’s personal power and predominate in their relationships with men. A group of women responded to a questionnaire about their experiences during membership in the Watchtower Society and after leaving. The results indicate that while in the Watchtower Society, women experience a higher degree of mental health problems than they do after they leave the group. They also report experiencing more egalitarian attitudes in their relationships with men after exiting the group.

Little research has been done focusing on the experience of women in “high-control” or cultic groups, despite the fact that women make up a large proportion of the membership of such groups. The type of group referred to here as high-control is defined by the degree of control and restriction the group exercises over the everyday life of its membership. Such a group can be focused on religion, politics, militarism, psychotherapy, meditation, commercialism, or simply a “special” leader (Tobias & Lalich, 1994). A high-control group differs from other groups in that individual behavior is excessively limited by rules and regulations, access to information is restricted or managed (especially information critical of the group), pressure is high to conform in thought and behavior to group norms, and members must put the group’s interests before their own. The leadership in this type of group is absolute and considered infallible; outsiders are generally viewed as dangerous or evil; and members leaving the group are generally punished or shunned. While all members of such groups pay a psychological price (as well as reap certain psychological dividends, such as a sense of belonging and purpose), women often face particular difficulties in groups that are patriarchally based.

This article explores the relationship between women and the high-control social climate of the Watchtower Society (WTS), commonly referred to as Jehovah’s Witnesses. The article reviews literature bearing on the Watchtower Society’s control practices and patriarchal organizational structure, analyzes psychological implications of WTS’s social climate, and reports on the results of a survey of 20 female former members of the Watchtower Society. The survey explored three areas: (1) the degree of patriarchal versus egalitarian attitudes subjects felt existed while they were members of WTS compared to what they experienced after having left the group, (2) subjects’ perceived psychological distress while in the group and after exiting, and (3) subjects’ perceptions of the degree to which the group controlled everyday life and isolated members from outsiders. The latter area included a comparison group of women from other religious backgrounds.

The Watchtower Society as a High-Control Group
Continue reading

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