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Jesus

“For He loved the world so much that he gave his only-begotten Son, in order that everyone exercising faith in him might not be destroyed but have everlasting life.”

Yehowshua

The original name of our Saviour was not Jesus or Iesous, but Yehowshua [meaning “Yehowah Is Salvation”]. In our Saviour’s word, His Father’s Name was given to Him. The Father’s Name is Yehowah.

Two factors contributed greatly to the substitution and the distortion of our Saviour’s Name. The first was the superstitious teaching of the Jews that the Father’s Name is not to be uttered and that the Name must be “disguised” outside of the temple of Jerusalem. The second factor was the strong anti-Judaism feeling that prevailed amongst the Gentiles. They wanted a saviour, but not a Jewish one.

Jesus

According to Wörterbuch der Antike, the substitute name can be traced back to the Latin Iesus and the Greek I·e·sous′. Then, it can be traced back to an adaptation of the name of the Greek healing goddess Ieso. This is confirmed by Greek-English Lexicon of Liddell and Scott. To Greeks who venerated a healing goddess Ieso, a saviour Iesous must have been most acceptable, suggests a writer in Philologische Wochenschrift. In spite of attempts to justify the “translating” of the Father’s Name and His Son’s Name, it cannot be done. A person’s name remains the same in all languages.

The father of the Greek goddess Ieso was Asclepius, the deity of healing. The father of Asclepius was Apollo, the great Sun-deity. Thus, the name Iesous can be traced back to Sun-worship. There is also a relationship to the Egyptian goddess Isis and her son Isu. According to Reallexikon der ägyptischen Religionsgeschichte, the name of Isis appears in hieroglyphic inscriptions as ESU or ES. Isu and Esu sound exactly like “Jesu” that the Saviour is called in the translated Scriptures of many languages.

Esus was a Gallic deity comparable to the Scandanavian Odin. The Greek abbreviation for Iesous is IHS, which is found on many inscriptions made by the Church during the Middle Ages. IHS was the mystery name of Bacchus (Tammuz), another Sun-deity.

Christ 

The Greeks used both the word Messias (a transliteration) and Christos (a translation) for the Hebrew Mashiach (Anointed). The word Christos was far more acceptable to the pagans who were worshiping Chreston and Chrestos.

According to The Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, the word Christos was easily confused with the common Greek proper name Chrestos, meaning “good.” According to a French theological dictionary, it is absolutely beyond doubt that Christus and Chrestus, and Christiani and Chrestiani were used indifferently by the profane and Christian authors of the first two centuries A.D. The word Christianos is a Latinism, being contributed neither by the Jews nor by the Christians themselves. The word was introduced from one of three origins: the Roman police, the Roman populace, or an unspecified pagan origin. Its infrequent use in the New Testament suggests a pagan origin.

According to Realencyclopaedie, the inscription Chrestos is to be seen on a Mithras relief in the Vatican. According to Christianity and Mythology, Osiris, the Sun-deity of Egypt, was reverenced as Chrestos. In the Synagogue of the Marcionites on Mount Hermon, built in the third century A.D., the Messiah’s title is spelled Chrestos. According to Tertullian and Lactantius, the common people usually called Christ Chrestos.

The oBible uses the Greek transliteration Messias in the New Covenant scriptures.

References