Ancestry, Cannabis

Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

Abstract

Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level).

As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated.

According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli.

Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness.

In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene.

In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers.

Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level.

The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers.

Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers.

Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude positive emotions when they experienced positive events and had a higher subjective happiness level.

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Governor McCrory signs Hope 4 Haley and Friends HB 1220
Cannabis

North Carolina Governor McCrory Signs “Hope 4 Haley & Friends” making CBD Oils Legal Treatment

Cannabis calms the excess electrical activity in young developing minds.

CBD RSHO (photo by Angela Glass)

In March, my husband Darryl and I took to the road to capture the stories of several North Carolina families hoping to treat their children with cannabis.

Most of the children we met suffered from debilitating epilepsy, then there are those with epilepsy and leukemia, and others with epilepsy and either ADD or autism or both. Continue reading

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Weed 2: Cannabis Madness (Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN 2014)
Cannabis

Weed 2: Gupta Doubles Down on Medical Marijuana

In the words of Dr. Sanjay Gupta, practicing neurosurgeon and CNN’s chief medical correspondent, “this scientific journey is about a growing number of patients who want the cannabis plant as a genuine medicine, not to get high.”

“It is about emerging science that not only shows and proves what marijuana can do for the body but provides better insights into the mechanisms of marijuana in the brain, helping us better understand a plant whose benefits have been documented for thousands of years. This journey is also about a Draconian system where politics override science and patients are caught in the middle.”

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Charlee Nelson dies, age 6.
Cannabis

Days after Charlee’s Law passes, Charlee Nelson dies at age 6

“She was in good enough shape to be there and be present. In the House when all the representatives stood up and gave her a round of applause, she perked up like she knew it was for her.”

Froerer said some representatives “really broke down” when they saw Charlee brought to the floor in a wheelchair.

Cannabis oil wouldn’t have cured Charlee, but it might have calmed her seizures and prolonged her life.

North Carolina children are fighting for the same treatment.

Sources:

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Marijuana Leaf Plays Epilepsy Cure Role, Salt Lake City Telegram May 20, 1949
Cannabis

1949 Salt Lake City Telegram: Marijuana Leaf Plays Epilepsy Cure Role

Marijuana Leaf Plays Epilepsy Cure Role, Salt Lake City Telegram May 20, 1949

Marijuana Leaf Plays Epilepsy Cure Role, Salt Lake City Telegram May 20, 1949

Reprint from Salt Lake City Telegram, May 20, 1949

Drug principles isolated from leaves of marijuana, an innocent-looking plant that grows wild in different parts of the world, are playing an important role in research on a cure for epilepsy.

This is the same marijuana which so many people fear as a habit-forming drug and which is noted for the opium-like dreams it produces in those who partake of it. Continue reading

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Cannabis

Montgomery of Phoenix Forces Child to Eat Marijuana

While families across the United States are broken as a mother and child move to Colorado, from their home states where medical marijuana is not legal, for non-psychoactive high CBD oil anecdotally proven to stop seizures, an Arizona family is being harassed by local state officials and Maricopa County Attorney William Montgomery…

The Welton family received a medical marijuana card from the state for their son Zander in September and began treatment with cannabidiol (high CBD oil) with great results. Continue reading

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Cannabis

Minnesota Moms Move for Medical Marijuana

Gretta and her mom, a nurse, Maria. Photo by Kare.

“If you would have asked me a year ago if I would have had my daughter on marijuana I would have thought you were crazy. I mean, really?” said Maria Botker. “But when you have put your daughter through something as scary as brain surgery like we did with Greta about three years ago, this seems like nothing, really nothing.”

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Cannabis

Moving for Marijuana

Molly Grantham’s WBTV report on Medical Marijuana for North Carolina kids

Watch Charlotte’s WBTV report “Moving for Medical Marijuana“, “Mom’s Talk More…“, and “Inside the Grow” by reporter Molly Grantham.

Both Maria and Liz are two moms of roughly 150-200 nationwide who have their children on “Charlotte’s Web”, a natural cannabis treatment for, among other things, pediatric epilepsy.  Early success stories of families who have tried everything else and seen nothing work on their children’s epilepsy, say it could be a miracle drug.

But, it’s illegal in the Carolinas because it’s made from marijuana.

Both Maria and Liz moved with their children.  Both had to leave their husbands for their jobs.

“It comes from cannabis,” says Liz.  “But children don’t smoke it.  It’s a liquid medicine.  We give it to our children like other parents give Tylenol.  And most importantly, it only has trace amounts of THC.  You can’t get ‘high’ from taking Charlotte’s Web. Having tried it now and having had to move across country to get it, I honestly feel this is ridiculous we can’t have it everywhere.”

See also…

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Cannabis

PBS “Clearing the Smoke”: The Science of Cannabis

MontanaPBS’s new documentary, Clearing the Smoke, reveals how cannabis acts on the brain and in the body to treat nausea, pain, epilepsy and potentially even cancer. Extensive interviews with patients, doctors, researchers and skeptics detail the promises and the limitations of medicinal cannabis.

Renowned Cannabis Activist Dr. Lester Grinspoon

Renowned Cannabis Activist Dr. Lester Grinspoon featured in Clearing the Smoke: The Science of Cannabis (MontanaPBS)

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Cannabis

NC Rep. Jones takes up case to legalize medical marijuana in some instances

By Molly Parker – Wilmington StarNews, originally published Jacksonville News: Monday, December 16, 2013 at 16:35 PM.

U.S. Rep. Walter Jones has taken up the case of a number of desperate North Carolina parents who are hoping state lawmakers will legalize medicinal marijuana for children with uncontrollable seizures. Continue reading

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Cannabis

Dr. Sanjay Gupta: "Sometimes marijuana is the only thing that works"

Dr. Sanjay Gupta says we have been “systematically misled” on marijuana… Take the case of Charlotte Figi, who he met in Colorado. She started having seizures soon after birth. By age 3, she was having 300 a week, despite being on seven different medications. Medical marijuana has calmed her brain, limiting her seizures to 2 or 3 per month.

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Cannabis, Neuroscience

Carolina Parents Push for Medical Marijuana

By Molly.Parker@StarNewsOnline.com
Published: Saturday, September 21, 2013 at 10:00 p.m.
Matt and Annetta Saggese work on speech and physical therapy with their daughter Netta at their Wilmington home. Netta has intractable epilepsy and undergoes various therapies throughout the week. Her parents want her to have access to medical marijuana.

Matt and Annetta Saggese work on speech and physical therapy with their daughter Netta at their Wilmington home. Netta has intractable epilepsy and undergoes various therapies throughout the week. Her parents want her to have access to medical marijuana.

North Carolina parents of children who suffer severe seizures are lining up for access to and pushing for legalization of medical marijuana where it’s not already allowed.

They want people to know they’re not radicals. And they’re not going rogue. They are searching for options.

They freely admit they are desperate parents staring down nightmares with their children, having watched them develop early skills only to lose them at the hands of numerous seizures, only to have tried cocktails of medications with debilitating side effects and watch them not work.

They want the option legal in this state to try medical marijuana. They want it so they aren’t forced to uproot and move to another state where it’s legal, where there’s been early success in treating seizure disorders. Continue reading

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Cannabis

CBD Approved for Childhood Epilepsy Study

Orrin Devinsky MD, Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University, was recently awarded FDA approval to conduct a clinical trial that will study the safety and tolerability of cannabidiol (CBD) in children with epilepsy.

“At this point, I think we really lack much data,” said Devinsky, who points to promising results in animals, but says the real push came from the anecdotal evidence provided by parents in Colorado.

“I’ve spoken with these parents, and I think they’re solid, good, loving parents, who’ve had very good experiences. Whether this will be borne out by scientific studies is uncertain,” he said.

Dr. Alan Shackelford oversaw the treatment of nine-month-old Kaitlyn Pogson’s Dravet syndrome, a type of epilepsy that causes her to have 300 seizures per week, administering high-CBD medical marijuana to the infant.

“The response was instantaneous,” Shackelford told the Star by telephone. “After the first dose, the seizures stopped … and she didn’t suffer a seizure for seven days.”

Charlotte now suffers one seizure every other week, Shackelford says, “a remarkable and heretofore unprecedented change.”

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"We in Israel have an opportunity, and vast responsibility, when it comes to international research about medical cannabis. Israel has a government-sponsored medical cannabis program and a convenient regulatory climate for research. We also have the health maintenance organizations, which possess rare databases of precious information about the effects of cannabis on thousands of patients who have undergone that treatment.
Cannabis, Neuroscience

The Quiet Giant: Israel’s Discreet and Successful Medicinal Cannabis Program

by Lindsay Stafford Mader, HerbalGram. 2013; American Botanical Council, Issue: 97 Page: 38-45

Despite its status as one of the world’s leading nations for medical research and innovation, the United States has a remarkably restrictive system in place to regulate medicinal cannabis research.

Even when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medicinal cannabis studies, the researcher or institution must then obtain approval from the Public Health Service (PHS), as well as procure cannabis material from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), which has a monopoly on the supply of cannabis that can be used for research throughout the entire country.1

Cannabis (Cannabis spp. Cannabaceae) is the only scheduled substance for which PHS approval is required, and those wishing to study the plant often have been rejected by the agency — effectively quelling this important area of science.

An increasing number of US states have taken matters into their own hands by legalizing medicinal cannabis for residents with certain health conditions.

But the federal government continues to raid and shut down state-based medicinal cannabis operations, even sending some of these business owners to prison.

Although the US situation is largely based on the discrepancy between state and federal law, Americans and citizens of other countries that ban medicinal cannabis could learn just how successfully, compassionately — and non-controversially — such a program can be handled by looking at the unique national medicinal cannabis program in Israel.

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