Culture, Documentation, Ethics, Technology

Bryan Hertz & Telcentris vs. Angela Baxley

voxox for business by Telcentris

This story started a year ago. I’ve waited one year for Bryan Hertz, CEO of Telcentris and my former boss, to do the right thing. However, I did file my complaint with the California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement in May 2011. The case is still pending.

September 2011, one year after being fired, and denied my final paycheck and reimbursed expenses, I began this campaign for social justice, which may or may not beat the law to the punch.

UPDATE: September 15, 2011, Shekhar Vyas, the lawyer for Telcentris called and offered a settlement. I didn’t even listen to terms, and let them know that while they thought the DLSE case was closed, it was indeed still open. One year later, I will not settle. I deserve full compensation and penalties. It’s the LAW. Bryan Hertz, and the Hertz family of “serial entrepreneurs” apparently think that they are above the law.

“I would recommend not sending out any tweets or communicating anything that could imply or cast the company in a negative light. There is no reason for that.  I would think you’ll want to keep things friendly and professional, and I’d like to do the same.” —Bryan Hertz, CEO Telcentris, September 17, 2010

Wanna skip the story? Just read the State of California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement Wage Adjudication Claim of Angela Baxley vs. Telcentris.

When I left San Francisco, the epicenter of the raging party of technology and design, I had very little oomph left in my heart. I think I’d left it on the Yahoo! Shuttle somewhere on the miles commuting back-and-forth between The Mission and the South Bay. One night, Micheal and I slipped quietly out of the city in a U-Haul headed south for San Diego packed with his belongings and mine. I’ll never forget the listless feeling pulling away that night looking back at the arm-chair that wouldn’t fit. My heart was crushed, my spirit broken.

I spent the months of November and December alone. Many nights I slept on the couch. At some point I started watching LOST and that fascinated me. Day after day I’d get up and move to the couch to vegetate and gaze unmoved at the brilliant blue sky outside beyond my patio. It was right about Christmas time that I’d had it. I was bored. Enough. I needed a job. Something to do. Great timing, the holidays and all.

I’d talked to my pals at Sapient (highly recommend them!) about work on the [redacted] account, but couldn’t even fathom the commute to Rancho Bernardo every day! If I’d wanted to commute, I could have stayed in San Francisco and worked for Apple or Facebook. Then there was this little family company, Telcentris. My Aquent (now Vitamin T) talent agent, Amy McFarland, told me about the family—serial entrepreneurs. I did my homework and learned that they’d had some legal issues with their companies in the past, and had been through more than their fair share of designers, but all-in-all seemed to be nice enough guys. Nothing I couldn’t handle. Continue reading

Standard