Angela Mari
Are You There God? It's Me, Gidget, Neuroscience

Hyperthymic Novelty—On Generosity: An Enhancement

“What will happen to life when science identifies the genetic basis of happiness? Who will own the patent? Do we dare revise our own temperaments?…”

I once met a physics teacher who immediately recognized me as the main character in the play he was nearly finished writing.

“Absolutely EVERYTHING I remember is realLithium just added a layer of fantasy on it (which I could perceive even at the time).”

Born to Be Happy

After reading an article “Born to Be Happy“, I found myself emailing Hagop Akiskal, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the International Mood Center at the University of California at San Diego whose “work on dysthymia, cyclothymia and hyperthymia challenged the concept of personality disorders, led to the development of a new instrument (Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS-A)), thereby contributing to the worldwide renaissance of the temperament field.”

“Information may travel at light speed, but meaning spreads at the speed of dark.”

But being told that I was “hard wired for happiness” seemed a bit over simplified and “hard wired” seemed an insult to this interaction-designer-wannabe-cognitive scientist studying neurogenesis and neuroplasticity.

On “Rewiring the Real

“Digital and electronic technologies that act as extensions of our bodies and minds are changing how we live, think, act, and write. Some welcome these developments as bringing humans closer to unified consciousness and eternal life. Others worry that invasive globalized technologies threaten to destroy the self and the world. Whether feared or desired, these innovations provoke emotions that have long fueled the religious imagination, suggesting the presence of a latent spirituality in an era mistakenly deemed secular and post-human.”

Continue reading

Standard
Cannabis

PBS “Clearing the Smoke”: The Science of Cannabis

MontanaPBS’s new documentary, Clearing the Smoke, reveals how cannabis acts on the brain and in the body to treat nausea, pain, epilepsy and potentially even cancer. Extensive interviews with patients, doctors, researchers and skeptics detail the promises and the limitations of medicinal cannabis.

Renowned Cannabis Activist Dr. Lester Grinspoon

Renowned Cannabis Activist Dr. Lester Grinspoon featured in Clearing the Smoke: The Science of Cannabis (MontanaPBS)

Standard
Cannabis,

Botany of Desire : Cannabis

Featuring Michael Pollan and based on his best-selling book, The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, this special takes viewers on an eye-opening exploration of the human relationship with the plant world, seen from the plants’ point of view of four familiar species—the apple, the tulip, cannabis and the potato.

Watch Full-Length Program on PBS. See more from BOTANY OF DESIRE.

Standard
"We in Israel have an opportunity, and vast responsibility, when it comes to international research about medical cannabis. Israel has a government-sponsored medical cannabis program and a convenient regulatory climate for research. We also have the health maintenance organizations, which possess rare databases of precious information about the effects of cannabis on thousands of patients who have undergone that treatment.
Cannabis, Neuroscience

Conditions for Cannabis in Canaan

Governments and drug companies are loath to fund the research needed to bring the drug into general use—Israel offers ideal conditions for such research.

“We in Israel have an opportunity, and vast responsibility, when it comes to international research about medical cannabis. Israel has a government-sponsored medical cannabis program and a convenient regulatory climate for research. We also have the health maintenance organizations, which possess rare databases of precious information about the effects of cannabis on thousands of patients who have undergone that treatment.”—Mimi Peleg Continue reading

Standard
link, Neuroscience

Patented Behavioral Recognition System

Link: Patented Behavioral Recognition System

    <p>The TV show &#8220;Person of Interest&#8221; depicts a national system by which America&#8217;s citizens are behaviorally monitored for abnormalities by which potential victims of crime and perpetrators are detected and thereby addressed by the hero. Most people think this isn&#8217;t possible recalling the movie &#8220;Minority Report&#8221; which based on a similar premise.</p>

People just have no idea—studying the cognitive sciences, especially the intersection of artificial intelligence and neuroscience, leaves me fascinated by all the technology that is currently in play in our society unbeknownst to most.

Case in point, check out this patent: AISight was shown off in Vegas at the ISC International Security Technology conference just a few weeks ago…

AISight® Behavioral Recognition System

In 2005, a team of experienced software developers and scientists with backgrounds in computer vision, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and theoretical physics began working at BRS Labs to create a technology that would allow computers to autonomously learn to recognize unusual behaviors observed by security cameras and warn security teams about those behaviors.

The results of this work – the patented AISight® Behavioral Recognition System – accepts video streams from standard cameras, detects and tracks subjects, characterizes their appearances and properties, classifies them, learns the patterns of behavior they exhibit, remembers those patterns, recognizes behaviors that deviate from those patterns, and alerts the user about those events in real time.

“These advancements would not have been possible ten or fifteen years ago because science didn’t adequately understand how the human brain models and manipulates data, and there wasn’t enough computer power to get the job done,” said Dr. Wesley K. Cobb, Chief Science Officer at BRS Labs. “Now, computers are exponentially faster and we have been successful in developing a method and system for analyzing and learning behavior based on acquired streams of video frames. This was an extremely difficult technical problem to solve, and to our knowledge, no other company has been able to approximate or duplicate what we have done.”

U.S. Patent Number 8,131,012, issued to BRS Labs in March 2012, covers the invention of using artificial intelligence learning modules to recognize behavior patterns in a video stream to identify objects and events that are unusual. BRS Labs has also trademarked the term “Behavioral Recognition™” to describe this invention and revolutionary method of analyzing and learning behavior based on streaming video data.

In addition to the behavioral recognition system patent, other BRS Labs intellectual property filings cover technical breakthroughs in background models, detection, tracking, object characterization, classification, scene characterization, target matching, techniques for unsupervised learning of spatial and temporal behavior, long term associative memories, anomaly detection using long-term memories, sudden illumination change, scene preset identification, trajectory learning, trajectory anomaly detection, spatial and temporal anomaly detection, clustering techniques in self organizing maps, classification anomalies, semantic representation of scene content, and a cognitive model for behavior recognition.

“Our now patented behavioral recognition system technology is deployed in very prominent security surveillance installations to protect the safety of millions of citizens and employees across multiple vertical markets,” added BRS Labs President John Frazzini.

Standard
Neuroscience

Molly on the Hyperthymic Temperament

The Hyperthymic Temperament

Posted on 18 December, 2011, Read more at Molly.com…

The Thymus Gland is located by the breastbone in the nook between our throat and shoulders. A small gland, at risk as our sensitive neck and spine adjust to the ever-shifting weight of our skulls.

The Thymus, throughout history, has been a bit mysterious. It is believed to be a part of human/primate immunity and behavioral posturing.

Imagine male Gorillas pounding their chests. It’s thought that gorillas don’t only posture, but stimulate a specific biological response – to excite or to calm – by pounding upon their prominent Thymus glands.

Continue reading

Standard